When a group of parents in Texas tried to force a high school to stop distributing images of naked children, the law firm representing them filed a lawsuit that argued the high school was in violation of the First Amendment.

“Texas does not have a child pornography statute and the law enforcement officers who have visited the school for over two weeks have not seen any child pornography,” John W. Smith, the lawyer representing the plaintiffs, told the Dallas Morning News.

“We have to prove that this is an unlawful use of school property.”

Smith said he did not have any evidence the high schools had anything to do with the distribution of child porn.

The high school has since taken the matter to court.

“The law of Texas has been that the government may not interfere with school activities or conduct,” the school district said in a statement to Newsweek.

“This lawsuit does not seek to interfere with or alter the legal rights of parents or the rights of students to participate in school activities and have their education protected.”

The law suit was filed against the district by the parents of two students at the school.

It alleges the school’s administration, the district’s chief technology officer and a school psychologist violated the First and Fourteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution by forcing the school to remove child pornography from the Internet.

In court documents, the parents said the images were “child pornography” because they depicted naked children in positions that “indicate sexual arousal and are in direct conflict with the content of the educational materials.”

The school district and Smith’s firm said they could not comment on the lawsuit.